ROUNDABOUT BLOG

Mrs. Warren’s Profession

 

When seeing Mrs. Warren’s Profession, it’s impossible to ignore the stunning image on the curtain that we see both as the show begins and between scenes. Here, the production’s Tony-winning Set Designer, Scott Pask, discusses that painting and its resonance for the world of the play:

Photograph of the curtain seen in Mrs. Warren's Profession

Photograph of the curtain seen in Mrs. Warren’s Profession

The painting is inspired by a textile design created by Duncan Grant, who, with Vanessa Bell, was a key member of the Bloomsbury Group, an artistic community of men and women, all like minded artists, designers and writers contemporary to the period in England in which we have set the play. Their work is influenced by the arts and crafts and aesthetic movements and has clear modern aspects, and socially, their world views were progressive.

The show drop's imagery can also resonate with reference to Vivie's struggle to find herself, and understand her mother, and chart her course to becoming a modern woman. Her desires to earn an honest living, and to understand the means of what has sustained and protected her throughout her life, and supported her education, have ultimately become a moral quandary, and she is caught in a maze, so to speak.
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2010-2011 Season, Mrs. Warren's Profession


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Upstage: MRS. WARREN’S PROFESSION

Posted on: September 3rd, 2010 by Education

 

UPSTAGE: Guides for Playgoers

For select productions, Education@Roundabout creates an issue of Upstage, a guide designed to enhance the theatre going experience. Each Upstage features interviews with the actors, designers and directors from the production as well as contextual information about the play itself and activities for use by educators.

• Mrs. Warren's Profession (0.4MB PDF)


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2010-2011 Season, Education @ Roundabout, Mrs. Warren's Profession, Upstage


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Roundabout has a great history with the work of George Bernard Shaw, most recently with Pygmalion and Heartbreak House, but also reaching back to Arms and the Man, Major Barbara, and more. It has been my experience that each production of a Shaw play reveals as much about the society that he depicts as it does about the society from which it is now being viewed. The characters he puts on stage and the questions posed by his work force us to closely examine our own attitudes towards a variety of subjects – and in the case of Mrs. Warren’s Profession, we find ourselves examining an essential issue for society: Morality. ... Read More →


Related Categories:
2010-2011 Season, Mrs. Warren's Profession


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