ROUNDABOUT BLOG

 

Dear Theatregoer,

If you had told me ten years ago that Roundabout would be at the forefront of producing new American plays, I never would have believed you. I started our Roundabout Underground program back in 2007 because I saw a need to support playwrights early on, giving them a space to launch their careers. What I didn’t realize at the time was how incredible it would be to watch these young artists blossom into some of the most outstanding writers working in the theatre today.

Last season, we had the remarkable experience of taking on The Humans, our third collaboration with Stephen Karam, whose debut play Speech & Debate opened the Underground. Not only was The Humans met with an incredible response in our own Laura Pels Theatre, but it then transferred to Broadway, becoming a Pulitzer Prize finalist and winning the Tony Award® for Best Play. I can’t tell you how thrilling it has been to witness the impact Stephen is having on the American theatre after debuting at Roundabout.

The company of THE HUMANS

The company of THE HUMANS

And Stephen isn’t alone in his success. Joshua Harmon, who you first met here with Bad Jews, will make his Broadway debut this spring with the transfer of Significant Other, another play first seen at the Pels.

I’m so proud that, in supporting young voices that we believe in, Roundabout is able to bring you such incredible new work. In 2017, we will continue this commitment with two more plays. In the winter, you can see Steven Levenson’s bold family drama If I Forget. Steven is currently making his Broadway debut as a writer of the acclaimed new musical Dear Evan Hansen. In the spring, join us for the world premiere of Napoli, Brooklyn, Meghan Kennedy’s moving and vibrant tale of an Italian family in 1960s New York.

Like Stephen and Josh before them, both Meghan and Steve made their debuts with Roundabout Underground, and I am thrilled to continue showcasing their work. Don’t miss out on seeing the next great plays to hit New York before anyone else.

Sincerely,

Todd Haimes

Artistic Director/CEO


Related Categories:
2016-2017 Season, Bad Jews, If I Forget, Napoli Brooklyn, The Humans


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Just Announced: Casting for IF I FORGET

Posted on: December 19th, 2016 by Todd Haimes

 

If I Forget

I’m happy to announce the complete cast of Steven Levenson’s If I Forget, directed by Daniel Sullivan. Please join me in welcoming Larry Bryggman (Lou), Maria Dizzia (Sharon), Tasha Lawrence (Ellen), Jeremy Shamos (Michael), Seth Steinberg (Joey), Kate Walsh (Holly), and Gary Wilmes (Howard) to the production.

Both Jeremy and Larry are longtime members of the Roundabout family, Jeremy having appeared most recently in Noises Off and Larry in Harvey. I’m thrilled to have them back at Roundabout alongside Steven and Daniel, and excited to welcome the rest of this exceptional cast to the Pels. For more information, please visit our website.

First previews for If I Forget begin February 2.


Related Categories:
2016-2017 Season, If I Forget, Roundabout News


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Love, Love, Love: A Play-by-Play Look at Mike Bartlett

Posted on: December 17th, 2016 by Roundabout

 

In under 10 years, Mike Bartlett has emerged as “one of our superstar playwrights,” according to the London Guardian. These are some of the milestone productions—from intimate chamber plays to ambitious epics—that brought his work to the attention of London and New York audiences.

MY CHILD — ROYAL COURT THEATRE, LONDON 2007

“A mother denies her ex-husband access to their nine-year-old son when he brings the boy back from a parental outing with a damaged arm. Derided by his former wife, who questions his paternal rights, the man decides to take the law into his own hands... Bartlett, in his first play, pins down with horrific accuracy the way children become the victims of warring parents. But he never lets you settle into easy moral judgments.”  Michael Billington, The Guardian

COCK — ROYAL COURT THEATRE, LONDON 2009 / DUKE ON 42ND, NEW YORK 2012

“You may, according to taste, find the title a come-on or a turn-off. But, far from being a sensational shocker, Mike Bartlett's play is a sharp, witty study of a man helplessly torn between his longtime male partner and a loving woman. Bartlett's theme, in fact, is less tortured bisexuality than the paralysing indecision that stems from not knowing who one really is.”  Michael Billington, The Guardian.

EARTHQUAKES IN LONDON — NATIONAL THEATRE (COTTESLOE), LONDON 2010

“Mike Bartlett has made his mark as a laser-sharp minimalist. Now he's been encouraged to ‘think big’ … in a sprawling, three-and-a-quarter-hour, five-act epic that, while set mostly in the present, spans the late Sixties and 2525 as it examines how life is lived under the threat of climate change and impending catastrophe.” Paul Taylor, Independent.

LOVE, LOVE, LOVE— ROYAL COURT THEATRE, LONDON 2012

“Compared with Bartlett’s big, baggy state of the nation dramas at the NT, this is a chamber piece, with just five characters. But it strikes me as Bartlett’s best work to date, with deeper characterisation, more personal themes, and scenes of extraordinary intensity and emotional truth shot through with dark humour.”  Charles Spencer, The Telegraph.

BULL — YOUNG VIC, LONDON / 59 E 59 ST, NEW YORK 2013

“Told in a brisk 55 minutes and without a trace of irony or a twisty turn ... Bartlett seizes upon essential truths. Perceptions matter. Be on the offensive. People are more savage than you can imagine. And although it has become a popular rallying point for sympathy, cries of bullying will get you nowhere in business — that’s the way it is.” Joe Dziemianowicz, New York Daily News.

KING CHARLES III — ALMEIDA THEATRE/WEST END, LONDON 2014 / MUSIC BOX THEATRE, NEW YORK 2015

“How do you write a play about the British royal family without making its members seem risible, banal or irrelevant? … [Bartlett] imagines a shaky monarchy thrown into crisis after the death of Elizabeth…by employing the language of Shakespeare to transform his protagonists from cardboard figures of ridicule into full-blown characters of tragedy and pathos.”  Sarah Lyall, New York Times.

GAME — ALMEIDA THEATRE, LONDON 2015

“The audience (is) divided into four discrete zones, each looking into a central glassed space in which an ordinary couple, trying to beat the housing crisis, has moved into a flat that could have come out of an Ikea catalogue or been computer-generated ... Mike Bartlett explores the numb thrills of video-game violence and the relationship between virtual assassinations and the extermination of real people in an ingeniously executed evening.”  Kate Kellaway, The Guardian.

 


Love, Love, Love is now playing at the Laura Pels Theatre at the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre. Visit our website for tickets and more information.


Related Categories:
2016-2017 Season, Education @ Roundabout, Love Love Love, Upstage


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