ROUNDABOUT BLOG

If I Forget

IF I FORGET: Read, Watch, Listen

Posted on: March 8th, 2017 by Rory McGregor

 

From the playwright of the smash-hit musical Dear Evan Hansen and previous Roundabout shows The Unavoidable Disappearance of Tom Durnin and The Language of Trees comes the fiery new family drama, If I Forget. Charting a family journey from 2000 to the months leading up to 9/11, the play follows the eruption of a family feud swirling around liberal Jewish studies professor Michael Fisher who has written a controversial new book, on the eve of his father’s 75th birthday. If I Forget is a powerful tale of a family and a culture at odds with itself. To give the show a greater context, check out our latest installment of To Read/Watch/Listen below!

 

TO READ

The Nineties: Reliving a decade

If I Forget opens half a year into the year 2000 and ends a few months before 9/11. This was a time of great change in American society, with new technology such as mobile phones and the internet really starting to take off. CNN has a fascinating documentary series available on Netflix, which charts the major structural changes which occurred in the various decades in the Twentieth Century. They will be releasing their next installment, The Nineties in late spring of this year. In anticipation of this, they have released a number of great articles, including the one below, looking back on the Nineties with some nostalgic photos.

TO WATCH

The Israel-Palestine Conflict: A Brief, Simple History.

News reports coming from the TV in the background are a constant reminder in this play of the ongoing conflicts in the Middle East. We hear snippets and the characters discuss their own thoughts and feelings on the matter, but it acts more as a backdrop, a constant reminder of what is happening elsewhere in the world. The Israel-Palestine Conflict is a very complex issue, and Vox have created a very informative and impartial short documentary charting the conflict’s history. It is worth watching if you want to find out more about the history of this region and how this conflict began.

 

TO READ

The Holocaust Industry: Reflections on the Exploitation of Jewish Suffering by Norman G. Finkelstein.

On the flip side to being impartial, this book written by Finkelstein argues that there is a "Holocaust Industry" which has negatively affected authentic memory of the Holocaust as it is exploited for political and financial gain, especially on the subject of Israel. An incredibly controversial and divisive text, it is included here as the book and its author are part of the research Steven Levenson undertook for the play. The book was released in 2000 and, much like Fisher; Finkelstein was denied tenure but later in his career in 2006.

 

TO LISTEN

Dear Evan Hansen on Spotify

And to round off, Steven Levenson wrote the book for the hit Broadway musical Dear Evan Hansen. It is a fantastic show surrounding a teen Evan Hansen who finds himself surrounded by turmoil following the death of a classmate. The original Broadway cast recording is available to Spotify, and you can listen to it here:


If I Forget is now playing at the Laura Pels Theatre. For tickets and information, please visit our website.


Related Categories:
2016-2017 Season, If I Forget


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Playwright Steven Levenson and director Daniel Sullivan in rehearsal for IF I FORGET. Photo by Jenny Anderson.

Ted Sod: Why did you choose to direct Steven Levenson’s If I Forget
Daniel Sullivan: I was interested in the play. I feel the ideas regarding the direction Israel is going in are important.  It seems to me that these are conversations that go on around the kitchen tables of Jewish families all over the country, all over the world. You just don’t ever hear it on the stage. That’s one reason why I was interested in Steven’s play. The characters have some powerful arguments to make. I thought what better place to hear them than on the stage because his characters are wonderfully theatrical.

TS: So, it had all the elements that you look for in a new play?
DS: Yes, exactly. It’s set in 2000 and 2001, during the failure of the Oslo Accords and what’s interesting is how little things have changed in the political context of the play. The constant threat of violence in the Mid-east, in Israel, the conservative and reactionary views against the more liberal views as to the direction of the country, all of those things are as important now as they were then. Perhaps a little more so now in terms of the religious right in Israel.

TS: What would you say the play is about?
DS: It’s about the “if” of If I Forget. It’s both the argument of the play and the story of the play outside its own political context. It’s also about what happens if we forget our own history, our family history. What happens to us? Who are we? That’s the constant question of the play.

TS: How do you understand the relationship of Michael and his sisters, Holly and Sharon, to their deceased mother? Michael also seems somewhat of an outsider in his own family. Both things feel important to the storytelling. Do you agree?
DS: Yes, I think that’s true. I think it accounts for Michael’s radicalization as well. The mother of the family has passed on and that’s a huge event. You try to locate who she was and the power she had in that family, which is now missing. The siblings are a bit lost and trying to find themselves in this new situation with their mother gone. That’s one of the motors of the play. Lou, the father, and his relationship with his son, Michael, is also key. And, with the mother gone, that relationship has become even more important to Michael.  He has been trying to prove himself to his father for a long time. The father is withholding any kind of praise from his son. Michael’s family hasn’t been able to grasp in any way his academic life, they haven’t understood the previous books he has written as part of his academic life. He hopes his new book will not only blow the lid off the academy, but will get noticed by the general population as well.  Keep in mind, Michael’s gone out of his way to marry a shiksa, which is also a statement to his family that he refuses to be pulled into the Jewish religion or culture. He has deliberately separated himself from his family.

TS: Do you think books still have the power to be scandalous and are able to bring about someone’s downfall?
DS: Yes, I do think so.  Michael has written this book so that the statements he’s making will reverberate beyond the academy. He knows that overstatement is what’s necessary.  Steven Levenson may have been inspired by the case of Steven Salaita, who was fired from the University of Illinois, and then sued and was compensated. Salaita’s tweets about Israel and Palestine were definitely alarming. They were violent. Protecting his First Amendment right was the main argument against his firing, but certainly what he had to say was scary. The same thing is true here with what Michael is suggesting in his book.   Michael has to know that what he’s written will not just shake the academy, but the larger world as well.

TS: Will you give us a sense of your collaboration with Steven Levenson, the playwright? 
DS: Steven came out to Illinois and we sat around and talked for a few days about the play. That was a majority of the work that we did on it. I work with a writer the same way I work with an actor: I just ask questions.  One of the things that I noticed in an earlier version of Steven’s play, was that the first scene was a hilarious family scene and I felt it was getting us off to a false comic start. It raised the usual expectations about watching a comedy and then the rest of the play turned out not to be that. Steven had written another first scene that he cut with Michael on the phone with his daughter Abby, who is in Israel on a birthright trip. He went back to that as the first scene, so now the play begins with a scene that I think allows us to visit not only a humorous world, but the political and moral issues at the heart of the play are in focus from the beginning too.

TS: And I imagine your work together will be continuing until you open.
DS: Our main focus right now is what is the cost of writing this book to the character of Michael.  Does it have a cost to him?   What is the decision at the end of the play costing him if anything? I keep going back to The Cherry Orchard and what does the sale of the cherry orchard cost the people in that play? I know the cost in The Cherry Orchard; I’m not clear yet what the cost of it is to Michael.

TS: The play takes place approximately 16 years ago. Did you have to do any research regarding the world events mentioned in this play?
DS: I am trying to get as much information as I can about the weeks surrounding the Oslo Accord and what was actually going on and to read as much as I can during that time period – but it is very déjà vu. The rhetoric of the time hasn’t changed at all except that everybody has gotten more dug in.

Jeremy Shamos and Tasha Lawrence in rehearsal for IF I FORGET. Photo by Jenny Anderson.

TS: What did you look for in casting the actors? What traits did you need?
DS: It was an interesting casting process. There were some actors I think who were avoiding the subject matter. It does need actors who are bright, smart people and who understand the issues at hand. That’s extremely important. It needs the most realistic ease of playing that you can possibly imagine. I want the acting to be completely naturalistic and detailed.

TS: How important will the use of sound or music be to the storytelling?
DS: I believe that the television will be on most of the time and it will provide the necessary sound, and I don’t want to underscore dramatically. I feel like that would be false. Sometimes music will help us escape something and I would rather keep the sounds environmental and any score will weave in and out of that. I don’t know at this point what I’ll do at the end of the play when things start to get abstract. I don’t know how I’ll handle that because it is stylistically very separate from the rest of the play.

TS: You are also directing Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes this year – do you think these two plays are in conversation with one another? 
DS: The Little Foxes is black and white. Regina is the most complicated and interesting character. But Hellman’s play is a melodrama and If I Forget isn’t. There is a certain mild queasiness that the two plays share, but I think that we still need to admire virtually all the characters in If I Forget and that’s certainly not true with The Little Foxes.

TS: Do you have any advice for young people who want to direct?
DS: Just relax and observe. Directors have to be empathizers and they have to study behavior. All we can do is to bring that into the theatre, but we can’t do it if we don’t empathize with everything we see and understand it in some way. That’s what I try to do. Most directors think the job is to talk people into doing stuff and I certainly think that’s true, but the arsenal that we have as directors is the fact that we don’t forget. We keep behavioral observations with us forever and that’s what we bring into a rehearsal hall. We must be able to see both sides of every argument. If I Forget is a play that tries to present both sides.


If I Forget is now playing at the Laura Pels Theatre at the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre. Visit our website for tickets and more information.


Related Categories:
2016-2017 Season, Education @ Roundabout, If I Forget, Upstage


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If I Forget: The U.S. Before 9/11

Posted on: February 22nd, 2017 by Roundabout

 

The Rise of the Internet
Today, we pull smartphones out of our pockets to look up information, stream music, and watch videos. But back in 2000, the most common way to access the Internet was through a desktop (or one of the new laptops) computer with a wired connection. WiFi hotspots, tablets, smartphones, social media, and most streaming video were all several years away.

While what we think of as the Internet--a network that allows computer networks around the world to communicate with one another--began in the 1960s, it didn’t become a part of American public life until the 1990s.

The Internet became available to the American public in 1992. Households could get Internet access for the low price of $10 for four hours, or $20 for 20 hours of use. Most Americans had dial-up access, which used existing phone lines and infrastructure to connect to the internet. Users couldn’t talk on the phone and surf the web simultaneously, and connections were slow. It could take up to 20 minutes for a single, image-heavy page to load.

Web browsers with graphic interfaces, which made accessing the Internet user-friendly, were introduced in 1993, the same year the White House launched a website. Amazon.com, Yahoo, eBay, Javascript, Internet Explorer, and Microsoft Windows all launched in 1995. AOL Instant Messaging, or AIM, debuted in 1997, giving millions of teens and tweens a new way to communicate (and miscommunicate) with their crushes. These programs caused a boom in Internet popularity: in 1995, just 14% of American adults used the Internet, but by 2000, 46% did.

Qualcomm Cell Phone, 2000

Cell Phones Circa 2000
Though the first cell phone went on the market in 1983 (and cost $4,000!), cell phones didn’t take off until around 1996. Up until that time, teens used pagers, which receive numeric messages on a small screen, to communicate. That began to change when competition drove down the price of cell phone plans, and the phones themselves became sleeker and smaller. The 1997 Nokia 6110 was one of the first phones without an antennae, and it came in four colors and offered paging capabilities.

In 1999, one-third of American adults owned a cellphone. The first phone with internet capabilities was introduced that year, though the tiny, greyscale screen made meaningful browsing difficult. Most phones didn’t have full keyboards: users simply pressed numeric keys repeatedly until the desired letter was reached. The average plan cost $40/month, and text messages weren’t included.

Bush-Gore Election
In the 2000 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush, governor of Texas and son of President George H.W. Bush, ran against Democratic Vice President Al Gore. Activist and attorney Ralph Nader ran as the Green Party candidate. The campaigns centered on domestic issues, including President Bill Clinton’s extramarital affair and impeachment trial, as well as the economy.

The election was the closest in United States history. Victory came down to whichever candidate captured Florida’s electoral votes, and early reports said Gore won the state; later reports declared Bush the winner. Gore actually called Bush to concede, but later called back to retract his concession. Official tallies showed only 600 votes separated the candidates, few enough to trigger a mandatory statewide machine recount. After the recount only 327 votes separated the candidates. The Gore campaign sued for a hand recount of votes in several counties, which raised questions about the design of the ballot and voter intent in unclear ballots. After several legal challenges, the Florida Supreme Court ordered a manual recount of ballots that voting machines registered as not indicating any presidential candidate. The Bush campaign appealed the decision to the U.S. Supreme Court, which reversed the ruling. Bush was declared the winner of Florida’s electoral votes and became the 43rd president of the United States.

Jim Lehrer moderating Bush v. Gore presidential debate


If I Forget is now playing at the Laura Pels Theatre at the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre. Visit our website for tickets and more information.


Related Categories:
2016-2017 Season, Education @ Roundabout, If I Forget, Upstage


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