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Indian Ink

2015 Award Season

Posted on: May 11th, 2015 by Roundabout

 

We're thrilled that On the Twentieth Century is the most nominated revival of the season! Congratulations to all our nominees this awards season.

Tony Award Nominations:

Blog-Award-TonyOn the Twentieth Century - extended through July 19
Best Revival of a Musical
Best Actress in a Musical - Kristin Chenoweth
Best featured Actor in a Musical - Andy Karl
Best Scenic Design of a Musical - David Rockwell
Best Costume Design of Musical - William Ivey Long


Drama Desk Award Nominations:

On the Twentieth Century
Outstanding Revival of a Musical
Outstanding Actress in a Musical - Kristin Chenoweth - WIN
Outstanding featured Actor in a Musical - Andy Karl
Outstanding Choreography - Warren Carlyle

Into the Woods
Outstanding Revival of a Musical

Just Jim Dale
Outstanding Revue - WIN


Outer Critics Circle Award Nominations
:

OCC_Logo135On the Twentieth Century
Outstanding Revival of a Musical
Outstanding Actress in a Musical - Kristin Chenoweth - WIN
Outstanding Actor in a Musical - Peter Gallagher
Outstanding featured Actor in a Musical - Andy Karl - WIN
Outstanding featured Actress in a Musical - Mary Louise Wilson
Outstanding Director of a Musical - Scott Ellis
Outstanding Choreographer - Warren Carlyle
Outstanding Set Design - David Rockwell
Outstanding Costume Design - William Ivey Long

Into the Woods
Outstanding Revival of a Musical

Just Jim Dale
Outstanding Solo Performance - Jim Dale - WIN

Read the full list of nominees.


Drama League Award Nominations:

DramaLeague_Logo135On the Twentieth Century
Outstanding Revival of a Musical
Distinguished Performance Award - Kristin Chenoweth
Distinguished Performance Award - Andy Karl

Into the Woods
Outstanding Revival of a Musical

The Real Thing
Distinguished Performance Award - Ewan McGregor

Just Jim Dale
Distinguished Performance Award - Jim Dale

Read the full list of nominees.


Lucille Lortel Award Nominations:

LortelAwards_Logo135Into the Woods
Outstanding Revival - WIN
Outstanding Choreographer - Lisa Shriver
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Musical - Ben Steinfeld
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Musical - Jennifer Mudge
Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical - Andy Grotelueschen
Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical - Emily Young
Outstanding Scenic Design - Derek McLane

Indian Ink
Outstanding Revival
Outstanding Costume Design - Candice Donnelly

Just Jim Dale
Outstanding Solo Show

Read the full list of nominees. 


Fred and Adele Astaire Award Nominations:

On the Twentieth Century
Best Choreographer - Warren Carlyle
Best Male Dancer - Phillip Attmore, Rick Faugno, Drew King and Richard Riaz Yoder

Read the full list of nominees.

 


Related Categories:
2014-2015 Season, Indian Ink, Into the Woods, Just Jim Dale, On the Twentieth Century


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Stoppard as Structuralist

Posted on: September 23rd, 2014 by Roundabout

 

The iconic composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim has written that he lives by one important rule in his work: Content dictates form. But for Indian Ink playwright Tom Stoppard, it’s the opposite that most often drives his creative process.

Indian Ink began with a formal idea and an image rather than with specific characters or a particular setting. He has explained, “I [wanted to] write a conversation between a poet and a painter. While the poet was having her portrait painted, she would be writing a poem about having her portrait painted. There would be this circular situation. That’s all I had. And not necessarily in India…I think simultaneously I’d been thinking about a play about the Raj, or at least India during the time of the British Empire. Things coalesced.” This evolution of the work is quite typical for Stoppard. He is a constant reader, mostly devouring newspapers and non-fiction, and he sees this reading not as research but as pleasure and creative fuel. As the various ideas collide in his brain, a play will start to emerge. He has said, “I can never remember why I write anything…I tend to get going on a play when several strands begin to knit together…It’s when things turn out to be possibly the same play that I find I can get going.”

IndianInk03

Cast of Indian Ink. Photo by Joan Marcus.

The great majority of Stoppard’s work developed through this collision of a form and an idea. For his 1982 work The Real Thing, many critics assumed that the playwright had made a decision to push beyond his reputation as an intellectual dramatist and write an autobiographical play that digs deeper emotionally. But in actuality, he’d had an idea of writing a play in which the first scene turns out to be the work of the person in the second scene. The logic of this structure determined that the main character would have to be a playwright and that the scenario could be repeated in interesting ways if the playwright were married to an actress who appeared in that first scene. Thus, character and story came out of form. Even though he put a playwright center stage, Stoppard claims, “This play wasn’t written in order to say certain things about writing. It was written because I liked the idea of the game, the device of having the same thing happen two or three times.”

This kind of game is evident in the structural playfulness of so much of Stoppard’s oeuvre. His earliest success, 1967’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, began with the situation he wanted to explore: two minor characters on the outskirts of the Hamlet story who don’t know why they’re here. It’s a riff on the work of Samuel Beckett (particularly Waiting for Godot) and Luigi Pirandello, and the content was dictated by the desire to play with this situation and with the idea of existentialism.

Chaos theory is addressed through characters in two time periods occupying the same space in Arcadia. The existence of God is explored through philosophy lecture as well as song and dance in Jumpers. In almost all of Stoppard’s work, the form and the idea have dictated the characters and the story. What’s remarkable is that we do not leave the theatre thinking about structure. Though structure may be the impetus, Stoppard is a singular dramatist in his ability to turn the intellectual into the accessible, leaving our hearts and minds equally jolted.

 


Indian Ink plays through November 30 at the Laura Pels Theatre in the Harold & Miriam Steinberg Centre for Theatre. For more information and tickets, please visit our website.

 


Related Categories:
2014-2015 Season, Education @ Roundabout, Indian Ink, Upstage


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Timeline of British India

Posted on: September 22nd, 2014 by Roundabout

 

Set on two different continents and in two different eras, Indian Ink follows free-spirited English poet Flora Crewe on her travels through India in the 1930s, where her intricate relationship with an Indian artist unfurls against the backdrop of a country seeking its independence. Fifty years later, in 1980s England, her younger sister Eleanor tries to preserve the legacy of Flora's controversial career. Below we chart the major events in the lead up to and during the British rule in India.

Before 1488: Multiple empires rule the territory of modern-day India. Small towns throughout the sub-continent are generally self-sufficient and self-governing. Indians practice Hinduism, Sikhism, Jainism, and Islam. European traders make long journeys by foot across central Europe and Asia to reach empires in the East. They trade for spices, silk, porcelain, and precious metals.

1488: Portuguese explorers sail around the southern tip of Africa. Europeans begin making the dangerous sea voyage to the East. In Britain, private investors fund the expeditions in exchange for a share of the profits upon the ship’s return.

Painting of India

Painting of India

1526: Babur the Tiger conquers a large part of northern India and establishes the Muslim Mughal Empire. Babur promotes religious tolerance in India and encourages trade. Succeeding Mughal leaders expand the empire.

1600: Queen Elizabeth I charters the British East India Company (BEIC). British merchants and investors band together under the umbrella of the BEIC and establish trading settlements inside eastern empires.

1707-1759: The Mughal Empire declines following a series of revolts. The BEIC military chases the French and Dutch East India Companies out of India. Soon, the BEIC is ruling parts of India.

1784: The first Government of India Act grants shared power over India to the BEIC and the British government.

1813: Missionaries allowed into India.

1835: Thomas Babington’s “Minute on Indian Education” is published. He writes: “We must at present do our best to form a class who may be interpreters between us and the millions whom we govern; a class of persons, Indian in blood and colour, but English in taste, in opinions, in morals, and in intellect.”

1857: The Rising of 1857
Sepoys, Indian soldiers in the British forces, mutiny. The revolt begins after rumors circulate that a new gun cartridge—that soldiers tear open with their teeth—is greased with both beef and pork fat. Both Muslim and Hindu soldiers are offended. The mutiny spreads, driven by frustration with the BEIC’s land and taxation policies, cultural suppression, and the spread of Christianity.

1858: The British government disbands the BEIC and takes direct control of two-thirds of India. The other portion, “native states” or “princely states,” is left in control of local rulers. The last Mughal emperor goes into exile in Burma. Queen Victoria becomes Empress of India.

1885: The Indian National Congress, a political party committed to independence from Britain, is founded.

1903 India Durbar

1903 India Durbar

1919: Amritsar
The British attempt to quash the Indian independence movement by instituting new laws allowing arrest without a warrant, no right to trial, and banning gatherings of more than four people. Thousands gather in Amritsar to protest. Soldiers pin the protesters inside a public garden and open fire. Over 1000 are killed. Many Indians join the independence movement as a result.

1927: The British appoint a constitutional reform commission without a single Indian member. The Indian National Congress boycotts the commission.

1930: The Salt March
Mahatma Gandhi leads tens of thousands on the “Salt March.” Under British law, it is illegal for Indians to collect or sell salt; they must purchase it from British salt companies. Making salt is an act of nonviolent civil disobedience. Nonviolent protests quickly spread across India, and thousands are arrested.

Ghandi During the Salt March

Ghandi During the Salt March

1935: A new Government of India Act creates provincial legislatures and establishes a federal government. Approximately 10% of the male population is given the right to vote.

1942: The British offer India future independence in exchange for greater participation in WWII. Gandhi pushes for immediate independence; negotiations break down. The “Quit India” movement is launched.

1946: Britain, struggling financially in the aftermath of WWII, announces its decision to leave India in 1948. Fighting between Muslims and Hindus breaks out.

1947: Independence and Partition
After continued violence, representatives from the major faiths of India divide the country along religious lines. Northern India, a predominantly Muslim area, becomes the nation of Pakistan. The southern regions, home to Sikhs and Hindus, become the independent nation of India.


Indian Ink plays through November 30 at the Laura Pels Theatre in the Harold & Miriam Steinberg Centre for Theatre. For more information and tickets, please visit our website.


Related Categories:
2014-2015 Season, Education @ Roundabout, Indian Ink, Upstage


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