ROUNDABOUT BLOG

Man and Boy

A Conversation with Frank Langella

Posted on: September 9th, 2011 by Education @ Roundabout

 

Ted Sod, Roundabout's Education Dramaturg, sat down with actor Frank Langella to discuss Man and Boy and his character, Gregor Antonescu.

Why did you choose to do this play and the role of Gregor Antonescu?

Because there is really no more rewarding character to play than the monster. And I have played quite a few of them.  If you look back from Richard Nixon to Count Dracula to the character in Fortune’s Fool to Strindberg’s The Father, even some characters in movies, Clare Quilty in Lolita. These men attract me and they are staggeringly exciting to play.  They are delicious.  And this is a man who will probably sit on the top of the list of monsters I’ve played. He’s conscienceless.  He’s a man with zero conscience. He’s a sociopath and is fighting for his life in the last pages.

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Related Categories:
2011-2012 Season, A Conversation with, Education @ Roundabout, Man and Boy


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From the Pages of ‘Man and Boy’

Posted on: September 9th, 2011 by Education @ Roundabout

 

Gregor: “Twenty-three percent off the value of all my shares in one day has apparently made the press photographers even more anxious to get close-up photographs of my dull face.”

Why is losing twenty-three percent off the value of shares a bad thing? In the stock market, investors profit when shares increase in value, and lose money when shares decrease in value. It can be as easy to make money as it is to lose money when investing in the market. The crash of 1929 attested to how volatile the stock market can be.

Most people during the 1920s had bought stocks “on margin”. Buyers would front a small percentage of what the stock was actually worth from brokers who would borrow money from the bank to officially buy the stock. In turn, the buyer would have to pay interest to the broker. If stock prices fell drastically, buyers worried that they would not be able to pay their brokers, so they would quickly sell their shares before stock prices fell even more.

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Related Categories:
2011-2012 Season, Education @ Roundabout, Man and Boy, Upstage


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A Conversation with ‘Man and Boy’ director, Maria Aitken

Posted on: September 9th, 2011 by Education @ Roundabout

 

Man and Boy was not a critical success when it was first done in London and then New York in 1963. Why revive it?

I found the play in the London Library and was surprised there was a Rattigan play I hadn't ever heard of. Moreover, I discovered that Rattigan thought Man and Boy was his masterpiece and would bring him back into critical favor. A new wave of young dramatists like John Osborne seemed to have relegated him to the shelf. When I read the play I was both thrilled and disappointed. Thrilled both by it's darkness and by the fact that I found  the fulcrum of the plot truly shocking - a rare sensation with period plays - and disappointed with its structure. Then the biographer of Rattigan, Michael Darlow, contacted me to ask whether I was aware there were 10 drafts of the play in the British Museum - and the Rattigan estate gave me permission to tinker. I wrote not a word, but I did re-arrange, because each successive draft that Rattigan had written seemed less potent in certain areas. I think commercial pressures had been brought to bear. Also Rattigan said bitterly that the leading role was played by Charles Boyer "like a head waiter" - when what is required is an Iago-like villain of  true evil, buttressed by charm. Frank Langella is a rare American actor who embraces villainy (have you noticed the Brits play them mostly on film?), and he is a real reason to do the play here in New York.

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Related Categories:
2011-2012 Season, A Conversation with, Man and Boy


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