ROUNDABOUT BLOG

95 Nominations for Roundabout’s 50th Anniversary Season

Posted on: March 30th, 2016 by Roundabout

 

Roundabout has received 95 nominations for our 50th Anniversary Season.

Congratulations to all the nominees this awards season!

Blog-Award-TonyTony Award Nominations:

She Loves Me - extended through July 10
Best Revival of a Musical
Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical - Laura Benanti
Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical - Zachary Levi
Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical - Jane Krakowski
Best Direction of a Musical - Scott Ellis
Best Scenic Design of a Musical - David Rockwell - WINNER
Best Costume Design of a Musical - Jeff Mahshie
Best Orchestrations - Larry Hochman

Long Day's Journey Into Night - limited engagement
Best Revival of a Play
Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play - Jessica Lange - WINNER
Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play - Gabriel Byrne
Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play - Michael Shannon
Best Director of a Play - Jonathan Kent
Best Lighting Design of a Play - Natasha Katz - WINNER
Best Costume Design of a Play - Jane Greenwood

The Humans - now playing on Broadway
Best Play - WINNER
Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play - Reed Birney - WINNER
Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play - Jayne Houdyshell - WINNER
Best Director of a Play - Joe Mantello
Best Scenic Design of a Play - David Zinn - WINNER
Best Lighting Design of a Play - Justin Townsend

Noises Off
Best Revival of a Play
Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play - Andrea Martin
Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play - Megan Hilty
Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play - David Furr
Best Costume Design of a Play - Michael Krass

Thérèse Raquin
Best Scenic Design of a Play - Beowulf Boritt

Full list of nominees.

Drama Desk Award Nominations:DD

She Loves Me
Outstanding Revival of a Musical - WINNER
Outstanding Actress in a Musical - Laura Benanti
Outstanding Actor in a Musical - Zachary Levi
Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical - Jane Krakowski - WINNER
Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical - Nicholas Barasch
Outstanding Set Design for a Musical - David Rockwell - WINNER
Outstanding Orchestrations - Larry Hochman - WINNER
Outstanding Costume Design for a Musical - Jeff Mahshie
Outstanding Hair & Wig Design - David Bryan Brown

Special Drama Desk Award
Sheldon Harnick for She Loves Me, Fiddler on the Roof and The Rothschilds

Long Day's Journey Into Night
Outstanding Revival of a Play
Outstanding Actress in a Play - Jessica Lange - WINNER
Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play - Michael Shannon - WINNER

The Humans
Outstanding Play - WINNER
Outstanding Director of a Play - Joe Mantello
Outstanding Lighting Design in a Play - Justin Townsend - WINNER
Outstanding Sound Design in a Play - Fitz Patton - WINNER
Outstanding Ensemble - Special Drama Desk Award

Noises Off
Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play - Megan Hilty
Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play - David Furr

Ugly Lies the Bone
Outstanding Actress in a Play - Mamie Gummer

Full list of nominees.


Drama League Award Nominations:DramaLeague_Logo135

She Loves Me
Outstanding Revival of a Broadway or Off-Broadway Musical

The Humans
Outstanding Production of a Broadway or Off-Broadway Play - WINNER

Long Day's Journey Into Night
Outstanding Revival of a Broadway or Off-Broadway Play

Noises Off
Outstanding Revival of a Broadway or Off-Broadway Play

Distinguished Performances:
Laura Benanti, She Loves Me
Zachary Levi, She Loves Me
Reed Birney, The Humans
Jayne Houdyshell, The Humans
Judith Light, Thérèse Raquin
Megan Hilty, Noises Off
Jessica Lange, Long Day's Journey Into Night
Michael Shannon, Long Day's Journey Into Night
Leslie Kritzer, The Robber Bridegroom

Read the full list of nominations.

OCC_Logo135Outer Critics Circle Award Nominations:

She Loves Me
Outstanding Revival of a Musical - WINNER
Outstanding Direction of a Musical - Scott Ellis
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Musical - Laura Benanti
Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical - Jane Krakowski - WINNER
Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical - Nicholas Barasch
Outstanding Set Design - David Rockwell - WINNER
Outstanding Lighting Design - Don Holder
Outstanding Costume Design - Jeff Mahshie - WINNER

Long Day's Journey Into Night
Outstanding Revival of a Play - WINNER
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Play - Jessica Lange - WINNER
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Play - Gabriel Byrne
Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play - Michael Shannon - WINNER
Outstanding Lighting Design - Natasha Katz

The Humans
Outstanding New Broadway Play - WINNER
Outstanding Direction of a Play- Joe Mantello
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Play - Reed Birney
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Play - Jayne Houdyshell

Thérèse Raquin
Outstanding New Broadway Play
Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play - Judith Light - WINNER
Outstanding Set Design - Beowulf Boritt

Ugly Lies the Bone
John Gassner Award nomination - Lindsey Ferrentino

Read the full list of nominees.

The Pulitzer Prizes:
The Humans
Pulitzer Prize for Drama - Finalist

LortelAwards_Logo135Lucille Lortel Award Nominations:

The Humans
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Play - Reed Birney
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Play - Jayne Houdyshell
Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play - Lauren Klein
Outstanding Scenic Design - David Zinn
Outstanding Lighting Design - Justin Townsend
Outstanding Sound Design - Fitz Patton

The Robber Bridegroom - playing through May 29
Outstanding Revival - WINNER
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Musical - Steven Pasquale - WINNER
Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical - Greg Hildreth
Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical - Leslie Kritzer - WINNER

Read the full list of nominees.


Astaire Award Nominations:

She Loves Me
Best Choreography - Warren Carlyle
Best Female Dancer - Jane Krakowski - WINNER
Outstanding Ensemble

The Robber Bridegroom
Outstanding Choreography Off-Broadway - Connor Gallagher - WINNER
Outstanding Female Dancer Off-Broadway - Leslie Kritzer


Off-Broadway Alliance Nominations:
The Robber Bridegroom
Best Musical Revival


New York Drama Critics Circle:

The Humans
Best Play - WINNER

Obie Awards:
The Humans
Playwriting - Stephen Karam - WINNER
Performance - Jayne Houdyshell - WINNER


Related Categories:
2015-2016 Season


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The O’Neill Legacy

Posted on: June 23rd, 2016 by Jill Rafson

 

"For Carlotta, on our 12th Wedding Anniversary: 

Dearest: I give you the original script of this play of old sorrow, written in tears and blood. A sadly inappropriate gift, it would seem, for a day celebrating happiness. But you will understand. I mean it as a tribute to your love and tenderness which gave me the faith in love that enabled me to face my dead at last and write this play– write it with deep pity and understanding and forgiveness for all the four haunted Tyrones. 

These twelve years, Beloved One, have been a Journey into Light – into love. You know my gratitude. And my love!

Gene
Tao House
July 22, 1941"

Eugene O'Neill

Eugene O'Neill

This dedication was written by Eugene O’Neill to his wife Carlotta Monterey when he gave her the script for what would become his masterpiece, Long Day’s Journey Into Night. And the playwright’s words make it immediately clear that this was not an easy script to write. While many of O’Neill’s 38 plays contain elements taken from his own life, none would be as deeply autobiographical as this one—which is why its author was reluctant for it to ever see the light of day.

Today, Long Day’s Journey Into Night is one of the most performed plays of O’Neill’s oeuvre, let alone of the 20th century American canon. But its fate could have turned out much differently.

O’Neill completed Long Day’s Journey Into Night in 1941, but it wasn’t produced in America until 1956. And if the playwright’s wishes had been followed, it would have taken even longer. Unwilling to see the representation of his own tortured family on stage in his lifetime or while anyone who could be hurt by it was still living, O’Neill left Carlotta instructions that the play not be published until 25 years after his death. In 1942, he had a sealed copy placed in a vault at his publisher, Random House, with a contract drawn up to make this decree official. O’Neill would pass away in 1953 at the age of 65, but somehow the world was introduced to the Tyrone family only three years later—or 22 years earlier than the playwright intended. So what happened?

Technically, Carlotta would choose to transfer the rights to the play to Yale University, which allowed her to get around the earlier agreement, but the emotional reasons go much deeper. Carlotta told some inquirers that Eugene always meant that play to be a “nest egg” for her, which could only happen if it were published and produced. She also argued that O’Neill’s concern had been that his fragile elder son, Eugene Jr., couldn’t handle seeing the play, but since the child passed away before his father did, that reason was no longer relevant. Of course, this reasoning ignores the fact that O’Neill reiterated his wishes months after his son’s death, writing to his publisher: “No, I do not want ‘Long Day’s Journey Into Night.’ That, as you know, is to be published twenty-five years after my death—but never produced as a play.”

It’s possible that Carlotta simply chose to bring Long Day’s Journey Into Night to the public so soon because she knew how good it was and how long it had been since her husband’s last success. Late in his life, O’Neill would have a long fallow period in which no new work came to the stage. He was busily writing during this time but was so displeased with his work that he allowed very little of it to be released. He had planned to create a great cycle about an Irish-American family but would only complete one piece, A Touch of the Poet, to his satisfaction.

The very act of writing became difficult in the playwright’s later years, as O’Neill dealt with a severe tremor. It’s believed that A Moon for the Misbegotten was the last play he completed before losing his ability to hold a pencil. He had many other partial scripts as his health was declining, but Carlotta complied with her husband’s request to destroy them. She would later tell the New York Times: “He didn’t want to leave any unfinished plays and he said, ‘It isn’t that I don’t trust you, Carlotta, but you might drop dead or get run over or something and I don’t want anybody else finishing up a play of mine.’ We tore them up, bit by bit, together. I helped him because his hands—he had this terrific tremor, he could tear just a few pages at a time. It was awful, it was like tearing up children.”

Perhaps it was this knowledge of all of the destroyed work that the world would never see that drove Carlotta to give us Long Day’s Journey Into Night so quickly. We may never know what motivated her or how Eugene O’Neill would have reacted to her decision, but we can certainly be grateful that we have this play in the world. It helped to seal O’Neill’s legacy as one of the great playwrights of the 20th century. He would posthumously be awarded his fourth Pulitzer Prize for this play (the most of any playwright), and he is the only American playwright ever to be awarded a Nobel Prize.

In O’Neill’s obituary in the New York Times in 1953, the paper of record wrote, “Whatever judgment posterity may make, the history of the stage will have to find an important niche for him, for he came upon the scene at an opportune moment and remained active long after the American theatre had come of age.” Famous Times critic Brooks Atkinson wrote of O’Neill, who had become a friend over the years, “Through the lines of his plays came an unconquerable and unpredictable energy that transformed the American theatre from a silly craft into a serious art. He boldly related the theatre to the intellectual life of the times…He was not interested in artful plots but in ideas—or specifically, the one idea of the destiny of mankind. Whether the individual plays were good or bad, and many were bad, he consistently aimed high and attempted to say fundamental things…he loved life in his own fashion. In fact, he loved it so deeply that he spent all his mature years wrestling with the essentials of it.”

Almost every single play he wrote dealt with some kind of tragedy and came from a deeply personal place laced with pessimism. It would be fair to say that Eugene O’Neill didn’t have a lot of hope for mankind, with one critic calling him “America’s own apostle of woe.” But audiences have embraced that woe, in the same way that terrible tragedies on stage moved the Greek playwrights whom O’Neill admired so greatly. Tragedy was not a new dramatic form, but it was reintroduced by O’Neill in a particularly American idiom. We can look with thanks to the legacy of Eugene O’Neill for the ways in which today’s playwrights spill open their hearts on the stage, giving us the kind of vital and moving theatre that the man himself would have enjoyed.


Long Day's Journey into Night is now playing at The American Airlines Theatre. For tickets and more information, visit our website.


Related Categories:
2015-2016 Season, Education @ Roundabout, Long Day's Journey Into Night


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Broadway in Boroughs: SHE LOVES ME

Posted on: June 20th, 2016 by Roundabout

 

SLM_600x240For the first time, from the NYC's Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, Broadway shows are being brought to neighborhoods across New York City through “Broadway in the Boroughs.” Featuring a showcase of vignettes performed by members of the current casts and orchestras from hit musicals including She Loves Me and Fiddler on the Roof, these lunchtime performances are free and open to the public. One performance will take place in each borough throughout the summer.

The series kicks off at National Lighthouse Point Plaza  in Staten Island at noon on Friday, June 24, rain or shine.

Directions:
If driving, please use GPS address as 1 Bay Street. For those taking the Staten Island Ferry over from Manhattan and arriving at St George’s Ferry Terminal Landing, we suggest to follow this route: Walking map to Lighthouse Point from SI Ferry Terminal, and for those coming from the direction of Staten Island Borough Hall to follow this route: Walking map to Lighthouse Point from SI Borough Hall.


Related Categories:
2015-2016 Season, She Loves Me


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James Tyrone: The Old Man

Posted on: June 18th, 2016 by Jason Jacobs

 

“He is by nature and preference a simple, unpretentious man, whose inclinations are still close to his humble beginnings and his Irish farmer forebears. But the actor shows in all his unconscious habits of speech, movement and gesture. These have the quality of belonging to a studied technique.” (From O’Neill’s description of the character James Tyrone)

Biographer Barbara Gelb has called the role of James Tyrone “O'Neill's Lear,” because of the actions and emotions it challenges an actor to perform. While strong paternal figures loom heavily in many of O’Neill’s plays, his robust characterization of Tyrone stands apart as his most powerful statement about his father, James O’Neill, and their complicated relationship.

Jessica Lange and Gabriel Byrne in LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT. (Photo by Joan Marcus)

Jessica Lange and Gabriel Byrne in LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT. (Photo by Joan Marcus)

A RAGS-TO-RICHES TRAGEDY

Although he became a successful American actor, James O'Neill lived his entire life haunted by a fear of poverty. Uncertainty remains about his actual birthdate, because he was vague in talking about his past; he was probably born on October 15th of 1845, in County Kilkenny, during the worst of the Irish potato blight. His father, Edmund, was a poor tenant farmer whose wife, Mary, was 17 years his junior. The family had five daughters and three sons, of which James was the youngest.

The O’Neills made a difficult sea voyage to America, arriving in Buffalo, New York when James was six. Like most Irish immigrants, they confronted prejudice and disdain and could find only the lowest paying jobs. Edmund became a dock worker. After five years and the death of oldest son Richard, Edmund abandoned his family and returned to Ireland, where he died in 1862. Ten-year-old James went to work in a machine shop to help support the family. As he watched friends and neighbors move to the poor house, James’s fear of poverty grew.

His older sister, Josephine, was determined to improve conditions for her family. She married a successful businessman and moved to Cincinnati, taking 16-year-old James along. Her husband gave James a position selling military uniforms in his store and hired a private tutor to educate him. Like many success stories, James O’Neill rose as a result of hard work and some good luck.

His theatre career began in 1867, when, responding to a friend’s dare, he took a job as an extra in a play. He quickly discovered an inclination for acting, and the stage manager recognized his talent. Over the next decade James apprenticed with some of the great actors of the age: Edwin Forrest, Joseph Jefferson, and Edwin Booth. He developed his craft, overcame his Irish brogue, and memorized over 50 roles—including most of Shakespeare’s heroes. His talent, good looks, and charm earned him the respect of his peers and popularity with audiences.

James was well-liked by women, both onstage and off. One actress recalled, "When played with other Romeos, I thought they would climb up the trellis to the balcony; but when I played with Jimmy O'Neill, I wanted to climb down the trellis, into his arms." Fifteen-year-old Ella Quinlan, the daughter of a Cleveland businessman, caught James’s eye. Two years later, they met again in New York and a long courtship followed. Against her mother’s wishes, she married James in 1877. By this time, he had become a leading man in a theatre company, earning an impressive $195 a week. Their newlywed happiness was soon jeopardized when Nettie Welsh, a former lover, brought a lawsuit claiming that James had already married her and fathered a 3-year-old son. Welsh lost the case due to insufficient evidence, but the scandal hurt the marriage—even as it helped James’s box office appeal. James and Ella had three children: James Jr., Edmund (who died of the measles as a toddler), and Eugene, born in 1888. Despite Ella’s dislike of the theatrical lifestyle and her long struggle with addiction, James remained a devoted and faithful husband.

In 1883, James first played Edmond Dantes in the melodrama The Count of Monte Cristo, based on Alexandre Dumas’ novel. Over the next 30 years, he performed the role over 6,000 times and earned more than $800,000 —a fortune for a man who started as a penniless immigrant. But it became a Faustian bargain: he had sold out artistic aspiration in exchange for financial security and felt trapped by the role. Still, he played Dantes until the production finally closed down in 1916. In 1920, with his self esteem broken and his spirit destroyed, James O’Neill died of intestinal cancer.


Long Day's Journey into Night is now playing at The American Airlines Theatre. For tickets and more information, visit our website.


Related Categories:
2015-2016 Season, Education @ Roundabout, Long Day's Journey Into Night


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